Tremar Baby Birds

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds

The following is a list of pieces in the Baby Bird Series by Tremar Potteries of Tremar and Liskeard in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. When I have images, those are posted below.

If you have pictures of Tremar items that I can use on this reference site or if you know of items not in the list below, I would like to hear from you. Please click on Contact in the menu above and send me an email.

  • Bullfinch (No. 7)
  • Corncrake (No. 8)
  • Fledgling (No. 1)
  • Grouse (No. 10)
  • Jay (No. 11)
  • Kingfisher (No. 12)
  • Long Tailed Tit (No. 4)
  • Nuthatch (No. 5)
  • Owl (No. 6)
  • Quail (No. 9)
  • Robin (No. 3)
  • Wren (No. 2)

Tremar Pottery Reference Pages – Contents Page

Information from Tremar Baby Birds Insert

The text below is quoted from the Tremar Potteries Baby Birds Insert. More information about Tremar inserts and images of the inserts are available on the Inserts Reference Page. In those cases where British and American spelling differs, I have included both.

Tremar Baby Birds Insert – Introduction

Tremar Potteries Limited, Liskeard, Cornwall, England, presents a series of British baby birds.

On these Islands about 2500 B.C. man began to fashion wildlife habitats in Britain, though his contribution was not to be a major one for another thousand years. Oak forests dominated the land and there was an increase in pine, beech and hornbeam. The basic pattern of Britain’s vegetation had now been set and the overall destiny of bird life was at its greatest. We have picked a group of birds which we feel epitomise/epitomize our damp and often mist-shrouded Islands. These are species that have stood firmly established over the centuries up until the present day.

Bullfinch

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Bullfinch

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Bullfinch

Although a handsome bird, it is a curse to the gardener, since it attacks fruit trees and ornamental shrubs, mainly from January to April. A single bird has been seen to eat the buds on a plum tree at the rate of 30 a minute.

Corncrake

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Corncrake

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Corncrake

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Two Baby Corncrakes Looking At Each Other

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Two Baby Corncrakes Looking At Each Other

The corncrake is a relative of the coot and moorhen. It is extremely shy and has a peculiar rasping voice, like a piece of wood repeatedly drawn against the teeth of a comb. Unfortunately, the bird has become virtually extinct as a breeding species due to modem farming methods.

Fledgling

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Fledgling

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Fledgling

A baby bird characterising/characterizing the appeal of them all. We hope the message gets across.

Grouse

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Grouse

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Grouse - The Grouse and the Quail are similar in appearance, but they can be distinguished because the Grouse has a slightly longer neck and a very pronounced tail.

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Group of Three Baby Grouses

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Group of Three Baby Grouses

Red Grouse, as native birds, are unique in Britain. They rely for food almost entirely on ling heather. Only the extreme hardiness of red grouse keeps them alive for the guns which open up on the ‘Glorious Twelfth’ of August.

Jay

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Jay

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Jay - Photo by heatherinhayle on www.ebay.co.uk

Its exotically coloured/colored plumage and ear piercing screech, make the Jay a conspicuous bird at most times of the year. They prefer open woodland in summer and in winter depend largely on oak trees for their food. They have been seen to pluck acorns and fly off to bury them in the ground. Later, when the weather is hard, they return to these stores to feed.

Kingfisher 

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Kingfisher

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Kingfisher

This is the most brilliantly coloured/colored of British birds and is largely confined to the banks of rivers and streams because of its diet. Its bright colouring/coloring is a defence/defense adaptation: predators have learnt to leave the bird alone, because its -flesh is foul-tasting. After catching his fish, its swallowed head first. A fish swallowed tail first chokes the bird as its fins and scales open.

Long Tailed Tit

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Long Tailed Tit

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Long Tailed Tit

This bird builds one of the . most elaborate dome shaped nests of all the birds in Britain. it varies in height from between 4′ and 70′ from the ground. Many nests have been known to contain the lining of up to 21 000 feathers and have the outside camouflaged with cobwebs. These inhabit woods and the woodland clearings but unlike the Great and Blue Tits rarely visit suburban gardens.

Nuthatch

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Nuthatch - Right Side

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Nuthatch - Right Side

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Nuthatch - Photo by dragonflypottery on www.ebay.com

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Nuthatch - Photo by dragonflypottery on www.ebay.com

The Nuthatch gets its name from its habit of wedging nuts in the bank of a tree and splitting them open with blows from its hatchet bill. It is in fact the only British bird that climbs down trees head first. This bird nests in a hole generally more than 6′ up a tree but will use nest boxes too.

Owl – Barn Owl

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Owl

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Owl - These owls show the subtle differences that are sometimes evident in pieces made by Tremar.

The Barn Owl, possibly the most attractive and eerie looking of our owls, is widespread throughout the British Isles. When hunting it relies not on its sight alone but can locate its prey in pitch darkness by its sense of hearing. Unfortunately not so common as they were many years ago. One theory is that as our countryside becomes more efficient there are fewer abandoned buildings for them to use as nesting sites.

Quail

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Quail

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Quail - The Grouse and the Quail are similar in appearance, but they can be distinguished because the Quail has little in the way of a neck and a much less pronounced tail.

These birds are so shy and secretive that they would hardly have been seen were it not for the dogs of shooting parties, which flush them in the autumn. Shooting men have taken their toll of quail, but earlier this century the birds were netted live, too. This practice was halted by law in 1937.

Robin

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Robin

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Robin

Chosen as Britain’s National Bird, the chest-puffing individual whose tameness is a tribute to the British character. For all their tameness they have been known to defend their own territory to the death from intruding Cock Robins.

Wren

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Wren

Tremar Pottery Baby Birds - Wren

Wren, the second smallest of our regular breeding birds and has long been a national favourite/favorite. Despite the affection in which they are held they were victims of a cruel ritual which until recently was carried on throughout these Isles , On St. Stephen’s Day (December 26) groups of youths would beat the hedgerows, singing and killing every Wren they saw. The origin of the Wren Hunt probably links with the New Year ceremonies of the Bronze Age megalith builders.

Tremar Baby Birds Insert – Conclusion

We hope that the series of stoneware baby birds will give you as much pleasure as they have given to us in the preparation of this series. Our stylised/stylized models of these stoneware birds have been carefully fashioned and decorated presenting what we feel are the most delightful aspects of these creatures.

8 comments

  1. Hello,

    Thank you for this site about the Tremar pottery baby birds series. I have a baby owl, which I must have purchased when I visited England on my one and only trip in 1978.

    I’ve always loved this small piece of art, and never thought about where it came from until today when I was dusting and noted the Tremar U.K. mark on the bottom … and happened to be right at my computer.

    The other babies are equally appealing … subtle colours, simplicity of line, and in positions that make them alive. I hope the potters lives continued well after they closed their business.

    Over the years I’ve often given collectibles to friends, particularly children I know. I’ve never been able to give the baby owl away in the way one is supposed to, with one’s whole heart ready to give. So I keep the owl, and it is one of my treasures and that’s for certain.

    I appreciate the information about birds you’ve included with the photos of the ceramic pieces. We all need to love and protect our birds, which are in such decline.

    Again, thank you and very best regards,

    Maureen

    in London Canada

  2. Julevlane says:

    I used to live five minutes walk from Tremar pottery in Fernside Park in the early 70s used to have birds and small animals brought to my home and I painted on the slip. My two girls were toddlers then and now my eldest daughter has started collecting pieces whenever we find them. I have recently acquired the fledgling which I paid £6 for but most of our purchases have been very low priced

  3. Nikki Jennings says:

    I have a number of these pieces that I collected from the burnt ruins of the st keyne pottery fire as a child, I didn’t even know they’re were any others around, am fascinated to know if they are worth anything?

  4. Charlotte Norwood says:

    Love these little birds — I have the first five — purchased in 1985. They weren’t very expensive then; how much would they be worth today?

  5. Mimi Fuchs says:

    I am interested in buying some pieces of the set , or the whole set. Is it possible?

  6. carol carroll says:

    I have the Bullfinch number 7. I would like to know the value. Thank you in advance.

  7. Sara Riley says:

    I would like to know the value of a couple of items, I have the Robin and the Stoat

  8. Patricia Collado says:

    I’m looking to find the price of the Robin or the Wren if possible. Please forward any information to me.

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