Posts belonging to Category 'Sculpture-Monument'

First Division Monument

Victory Statute Atop the Column of the First Division Monument

Victory Statute Atop the Column of the First Division Monument

The First Division Monument sometimes referred to as the First Division Memorial is located just to the east of 17th Street NW near the intersection of State Place NW. It is just south of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building.

First Division Monument With the Eisenhower Executive Office Building Behind It

First Division Monument With the Eisenhower Executive Office Building Behind It

Originally the monument was to honor the heroic efforts of the soldiers of the United States Army’s First Infantry Division in World War I. First Division soldiers from subsequent wars have been honored by additions to the monument.

The architect of the memorial was Cass Gilbert. The sculpture of the Victory statue was done by Daniel Chester French. All of the funds for the monument as well as the additions was provided by the Society of the First Infantry Division (previously known as the Society of the First Division).

The First Division Monument is located near the intersection of 17th Street NW and State Place NW. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the First Division Monument.

Closest Metro Station: The Farragut West Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the First Division Monument.

Washington Monument

Washington Monument at the West End of the National Mall

Washington Monument at the West End of the National Mall

The 555 foot tall Washington Monument is located at the west end of the National Mall and in a straight line with the Lincoln Memorial, the Reflecting Pool, the World War II Memorial and the United States Capitol.

The monument was designed by Robert Mills and was constructed between 1848 and 1884 with a significant delay in construction in the middle of that period caused in large part by the American Civil War.

The Washington Monument is constructed primarily of white marble from Maryland with some from Massachusetts. The foundation is blue gneiss from Maryland and granite from Maine. It is the tallest stone structure in the world.

Click Washington Monument to visit the Washington Monument website.

The Washington Monument has no street address. It is located between 15th and 17th Streets NW, and between Constitution Avenue NW and Independence Avenue SW in Washington DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Washington Monument.

Closest Metro Station: The Smithsonian Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the Washington Monument.

Washington Monument With a Variety of Background Images

Washington Monument With a Variety of Background Images

Lost Symbol by Dan Brown: The Washington Monument is mentioned in chapters 1, 3, 6, 128, 129, 131, 132 and the Epilogue.

Second Division Memorial

Flaming, Golden Sword - Second Division Memorial - Near Ellipse, White House and Washington Monument

Flaming, Golden Sword - Second Division Memorial - Near Ellipse, White House and Washington Monument

Memorial to the Second Infantry Division of the United States Army

Memorial to the Second Infantry Division of the United States Army

The Second Infantry Division Memorial is located between the White House and the Washington Monument and is close to both. 

This memorial was dedicated in 1936 to honor those in the division who lost their lives in World War I. The flaming, golden sword is held aloft, symbolically blocking the Germans. James Earle Fraser was the sculptor. The inscription under the sword reads, “To Our Dead, 1917-1919.”

A later addition on the west side (left in the photograph) honors members of the division who died in World War II, and an addition of the east side (right in the photograph) honors those who died in the Korean Conflict. The memorial was dedicated again in 1963.

Insignia of the Second Infantry Division Carved Into Cross Guard of Sword

Insignia of the Second Infantry Division Carved Into Cross Guard of Sword

The insignia of the Second Infantry Division of the United States Army appears in the center of the sword’s cross-guard.

The Second Division Memorial is located just outside the Ellipse and between the White House and the Washington Monument near the intersection of Constitution Avenue NW and 17th Street NW. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Second Division Memorial.

Closest Metro Station: The Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Second Division Memorial.

United States Capitol – National Statuary Hall

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Eagle With Wings Spread On South Wall Below Sculpture of Liberty, Eagle and Snake

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Eagle With Wings Spread On South Wall Below Sculpture of Liberty, Eagle and Snake

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Sculpture of Liberty, Eagle and Snake On South Wall

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Sculpture of Liberty, Eagle and Snake On South Wall

The National Statuary Hall is located in the United States Capitol and is south of the Rotunda. This was originally constructed as the chamber for the House of Representatives and was used as such after construction was completed in 1819. The semicircular room with its curved ceiling caused echoes that made it difficult to conduct business in the chamber. The House of Representatives moved into its current chamber in 1857.

The room is now used for the display of statuary. Each state was asked to contribute two statutes of prominent people, and many of those statutes are displayed in this room.

Visitor access to the National Statuary Hall is through the US Capitol Visitor Center. Click United States Capitol to see the StationStart.com entry about the United States Capitol and the US Capitol Visitor Center.

The United States Capitol is located at 100 Constitution Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the United States Capitol Visitor Center.

Closest Metro Station: Capitol South on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the United States Capitol.

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Some of the Sculptures Provided by the Various States

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Some of the Sculptures Provided by the Various States

United States Capitol – Statute of Freedom

Plaster Model for Statute of Freedom - Model Located in the United States Capitol Visitor Center

Plaster Model for Statute of Freedom - Model Located in the United States Capitol Visitor Center

Crowning the United States Capitol is the Statute of Freedom by Thomas Crawford. The female figure, originally known as the Freedom Triumphant in War and Peace, is 19.5 feet tall and weighs 15,000 pounds (7.5 tons, 6,800 kg). In her right hand she grasps the pommel and grip of a sheathed sword. The shield of the United States is held steady in her left hand which also holds a laurel wreath.

Statute of Freedom Located Atop the United States Capitol Dome

Statute of Freedom Located Atop the United States Capitol Dome

Thomas Crawford created the full size plaster model of the statute in Rome, but he died in 1857 while the model was still in his studio. The six crates containing the plaster model all made it to Washington by March 1859. By late 1862 the statute had been cast in bronze in sections by Clark Mills, had been assembled and was on display on the capitol grounds. The last of the sections was installed in place atop the Capitol dome on December 2, 1963.

The plaster model is now on display in the Capitol Visitor Center. Click United States Capitol to see the StationStart.com entry about the United States Capitol.

The United States Capitol is located at 100 Constitution Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Statute of Freedom.

Closest Metro Station: Capitol South on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the United States Capitol.

Folger Shakespeare Library – Puck Sculpture

Puck From William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream on West Lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Puck From William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream on West Lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library

On the west lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library is a marble sculpture of Puck (also known as Robin Goodfellow) . This character is from William Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Natural Setting For Puck At the Head of a Fountain on West Lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Natural Setting For Puck At the Head of a Fountain on West Lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Puck, Oberon’s jester, uses magic to create mischief through deliberate efforts and inadvertent mistakes. Puck is both a good natured and sometimes cruel sprite known to some as a hobgoblin.

In Act 3, Scene 2 of A Midsummer’s Night Dream Puck observes: “Lord, what fools these mortals be!”

The 1932 sculpture by Brenda Putnam has been repaired and now has a silver sheen.

Click Bas Relief Marble Sculptures to see the StationStart.com entry about the sculpted scenes from nine of William Shakespeare’s plays that line the front of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Click Folger Shakespeare Library to see the StationStart.com entry about the library and Elizabethan Theatre.

The Folger Shakespeare Library is located at 201 East Capitol Street SE, Washington, DC, and Puck is the central figure in a fountain at the west end of the building. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the sculpture of Puck at the west end of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Closest Metro Station: The Capital South Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Folger Shakespeare Library – Marble Sculpture

Folger Shakespeare Library - Marble Bas Relief Sculpture Depicting Macbeth with the Three Witches

Folger Shakespeare Library - Marble Bas Relief Sculpture Depicting Macbeth with the Three Witches

The Folger Shakespeare Library has nine large sculptures carved in white Georgia marble along the front of the building. These are the work of John Gregory (1879 – 1958). Each bas relief sculpture depicts a scene from one of William Shakespeare’s plays.

The Nine Marble Bas Relief Sculptures Along the Front of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Nine Marble Nine Bas Relief Sculptures Along the Front of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Going left to right across the front of the building and also from left to right in the 3 by 3 grid above starting with the top row:

1. A Midsummer Night’s Dream
2. Romeo and Juliet
3. The Merchant of Venice
4. Macbeth
5. Julius Caesar
6. King Lear
7. Richard III
8. Hamlet
9. Henry IV, Part I

Click Puck Sculpture to see the StationStart.com entry about the sculpture on the west lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library of the character from William Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Click Folger Shakespeare Library to see the StationStart.com entry about the library and Elizabethan Theatre.

The Folger Shakespeare Library is located at 201 East Capitol Street SE, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Folger Shakespeare Library and the Elizabethan Theatre.

Closest Metro Station: The Capital South Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Alexander Calder – The Gwenfritz

Alexander Calder Stabile (Sculpture) The Gwenfritz

Alexander Calder Stabile (Sculpture) The Gwenfritz Located Near the Museum of American History at the Intersection of 14th Street NW and Constitution Avenue NW.

This sculpture by Alexander Calder is located on the grounds of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History. There is an inscription in granite near the sculpture and a plaque on the stone circle surrounding the sculpture that provide information about the work.

The granite marker reads:

STABILE
by Alexander Calder
1968
Gift of the Morris and
Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation

The plaque reads:

The GWENFRITZ
by Alexander Calder
American (1898-1976)

This stabile, named for Mrs. Gwendolyn Cafritz, is one of the largest and most important produced during Alexander Calder’s career. The 35-ton sculpture was designed and fabricated in France and shipped here for installation in June 1969.

Calder was born in Philadelphia, the son and grandson of sculptors. He preferred to train in mechanical engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology, however, before going to New York in 1923 to study painting a drawing at the Art Students’ League. While living in Paris from 1926 to 1938, Calder made a miniature circus of animated wire figures and gave performances that brought him renown. His first mobiles, so named by his friend Marcel Duchamp, appeared in 1931.

The East Wing of the National Gallery of Art, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, and the National Museum of American Art also display Calder sculptures.

Gift of the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation.

The Alexander Calder Stabile GWENFRITZ is located on the southwest corner at the intersection of 14th Street NW and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Alexander Calder Stabile GWENFRITZ near the Museum of American History.

Closest Metro Station: The Metro Station nearest to The Gwenfritz is the Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines.

Russia House – Real World DC

Russia House Restaurant and Lounge, 1800 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC

In Episode 4 of Real World DC the Houseguests Visit Russia House Restaurant and Lounge, 1800 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC

Sculpture of Andrei Sakharov by P. Shapiro Outside Russia House Restuarant and Lounge

Sculpture of Andrei Sakharov by P. Shapiro Outside Russia House Restuarant and Lounge

In Episode 4 of Real World DC what looks like the all the houseguests (Andrew, Ashley, Callie, Emily, Erika, Josh, Mike and Ty) head out to dinner at Russia House Restaurant and Lounge located at the corner of Connecticut and Florida Avenues NW, Washington DC. I believe this is an early stop in a night of partying.

Interestingly outside the restaurant is a bronze sculpture of academician Andrei Sakharov by sculptor P. Shapiro.

The Russia House Restaurant and Lounge is located at 1800 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC. It is just across Connecticut Avenue from Buca Di Beppo, the restuarant the houseguests visited in Episode 1. Russia House is only about a block and a half from the Real World DC house.  Click Here for Google Map showing the location of Russia House Restaurant and Lounge.

Closest Metro Station: The Dupont Circle Metro Station on the Red Line is nearest to Russia House.

Russia House Sign, 1800 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC

Russia House Sign, 1800 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC

Russia House Restaurant and Lounge, 1800 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC

Russia House Restaurant and Lounge, 1800 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, DC

Daniel Webster Memorial

Daniel Webster Memorial at Scott Circle NW in Washington DC

Daniel Webster Memorial at Scott Circle NW in Washington DC

In 1957 the United States Senate named Daniel Webster as one of its five most outstanding members. He served there before the Civil War and attempted to resolve the differences between the North and the South though compromise.

Bronze Sculpture in the Base of Daniel Webster Memorial

Bronze Sculpture in the Base of Daniel Webster Memorial Located at Scott Circle in Washington DC

The Daniel Webster Memorial is interesting, in part, because it has two dioramas (is solid bronze sculpture can be called a diorama), one on the front of the monument and the other on the back.

Bronze Sculpture in the Base of Daniel Webster Memorial

Bronze Sculpture in the Base of Daniel Webster Memorial Located at Scott Circle in Washington DC

Daniel Webster was born in Salisbury, New Hampshire on January 18, 1782 and died at Marshfield, Massachusetts on October 24, 1852.

The following things are carved into the stone of the monument:

GIVEN BY STILSON HUTCHINS
A NATIVE OF N.H.
DEDICATED JAN. 18, 1900

and

OUR COUNTRY
OUR WHOLE COUNTRY
AND NOTHING BUT
OUR COUNTRY

and

EXPOUNDER
AND DEFENDER
OF THE
CONSTITUTION

The Daniel Webster Memorial is located on Scott Circle NW, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Daniel Webster Memorial.

Closest Metro Station: The Farragut North Metro Station is nearest to the Daniel Webster Memorial.

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