Posts belonging to Category 'Sculpture-Monument'

Women’s Titanic Memorial – Washington DC

Women’s Titanic Memorial – Washington DC – With Colorful Evening Sky

Women’s Titanic Memorial – Washington DC – With Colorful Evening Sky

The Women’s Titanic Memorial is located at the southern end of Washington Channel Park just outside Fort McNair in Southwest Washington, DC.

There is an engraving on the front of the base of the memorial. The letters on the memorial are all capitals, and there is no punctuation. In the following quotation, some letters have been converted to lower case, and punctuation has been added.

To the brave men who perished in the wreck of the Titanic April 15, 1912. They gave their lives that women and children might be saved.

Erected by the Women of America

An engraving on the back of the base of the memorial reads:

TO THE YOUNG AND THE OLD

THE RICH AND THE POOR

THE IGNORNAT AND THE LEARNED

ALL

WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES NOBLY

TO SAVE WOMEN AND CHILDREN

The memorial was designed by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. Born into one wealthy family, during the summers she lived at the Vanderbilt family mansion, The Breakers, in Newport, Rhode Island. She married Harry Payne Whitney and into a second wealthy family. She studied art, became a sculptor and worked to help women succeed in art.

Women’s Titanic Memorial – Looking South

Women’s Titanic Memorial – Looking South

The memorial was carved by John Horrigan of Quincy, Massachusetts. He sculpted many other statutes including the Continental Soldier at Valley Forge. That sculpture was cast in bronze from a model by Horrigan. It was designed to represent members of the Continental Army from the state of New Jersey. It was placed in Valley Forge, PA upon the site that had been occupied by the New Jersey Brigade.

Interestingly enough the scene from the movie Titanic (directed by James Cameron) with Leonardo DiCaprio (as Jack Dawson) and Kate Winslet (as Rose DeWitt Bukater) standing at the bow of the Titanic is quite reminiscent of this memorial. This concept of taking flight at the front of the ship with both arms spread wide is similar enough to this figure that the idea for the scene may have been suggested by the statute in this memorial.

The Women’s Titanic Memorial is located at the southern end of Washington Channel Park at the point where the western end of P Street SW comes to a dead end one block to the west of the intersection of 4th and P Streets, SW, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of Titanic Memorial, Washington Channel Park, Washington, DC.

Closest Metro Station: The Waterfront-SEU Metro Station on the Green Line is nearest to the Women’s Titanic Memorial.

The Daguerre Monument by Jonathan Scott Hartley

The Daguerre Monument - Smithsonian Institution National Portrait Gallery in the Background

The Daguerre Monument - Smithsonian Institution National Portrait Gallery in the Background

This sculpture is located on the grounds of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery.

A plaque near the monument provides following information:

The Daguerre Monument

The French artist Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre (1787-1851) became interested in the 1820s in trying to capture images photographically. In August 1839 his “Daguerreotype” technique–fixing an image on a light-sensitive, polished silver plate–was announced to the public. This was the first photographic process to be used widely in Europe and the United States.

In 1890 the Professional Photographers of America donated this monument to Daguerre, by the American sculptor Jonathan Scott Hartley, to the American people. The bronze figure was cast by the Henry-Bonnard Bronze Company of New York. Placed in the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum Building (now known as the Arts and Industries Building) to celebrate the first half-century of photography, the monument was displayed on the Mall from 1897 to 1969.

The rededication of the Daguerre Monument in 1989 was sponsored by the Professional Photographers of America in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of photography.

The inscription on the monument reads:

Photography, the electric telegraph, and the steam engine are the three great discoveries of the age. No five centuries in human progress can show such strides as these.

The Daguerre Monument is located on the grounds of the National Portrait Gallery near the southeast corner of the building. The National Portrait Gallery is located at 801 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Daguerre Monument.

Closest Metro Station: The Gallery Place-Chinatown Metro Station on the Red Line is nearest to the Portrait Gallery.

Modern Head Sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein

Modern Head Sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein

Modern Head Sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein

This sculpture is located on the grounds of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery. But on September 11, 2001 it was located in New York City only one block from the World Trade Center when terrorists flew one commercial airliner into each of the World Trade Center’s towers.

This sculpture survived the attacks of 9/11, and soon after that it was moved.

Modern Head - Smithsonian Informational Sign

Modern Head - Smithsonian Informational Sign

A plaque on the fence by the sculpture provides information about it. The text is set out below.

Roy Lichtenstein
born New York City 1923-died New York City 1997

Modern Head
conceived 1974
fabricated 1989-1990 by Lippincott Inc., edition I/I
painted stainless steel

Gift of Jeffrey H. Loria in loving memory of his sister, Harriet Loria Popowitz.

Roy Lichtenstein began creating his Modern Head series in the late 1960s with the idea that man can be made to look like a machine and the image manufactured by an industrial source. This concept pervaded the artist’s work throughout his career. In Modern Head he referenced the flat planes, precision, and abstract geometric forms associated with the 1930s art deco architecture and design.

Modern Head was installed in 1996 in Battery Park City, one block from the World Trade Center, by the Public Art Fund of New York City (top photo). The sculpture survived the destruction of 9/11 with only surface scratches and became a memo board for the FBI during its ensuing investigations (bottom photo). Note the white ash on the base and the windows blown out of the building in the background of the photograph taken by insurance agent Michael Fischman on September 21st. The sculpture was removed on November 9, 2001, for its protection.

Modern Head is located on the grounds of the National Portrait Gallery near the southwest corner of the building. The National Portrait Gallery is located at 801 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Modern Head Sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein.

Closest Metro Station: The Gallery Place-Chinatown Metro Station on the Red Line is nearest to the Portrait Gallery.

Commodore John Barry

Commodore John Barry Monument - Franklin Square Park - Washington, DC

Commodore John Barry Monument - Franklin Square Park - Washington, DC

John Barry served in the Continental Navy and fought in the Revolutionary War. He is known as the Father of the American Navy.

Sculpture at Top of Commodore John Barry Monument - Franklin Square Park - Washington, DC

Sculpture at Top of Commodore John Barry Monument - Franklin Square Park - Washington, DC

The inscription at the bottom of the monument reads:

John Barry
Commodore United States Navy
Born County Wexford Ireland 1745
Died in Philadelphia 1803

This monument consists of a statute of Commodore Barry standing on top of a base of pink marble with steps of pink granite. The sculptor was John J. Boyle, and the standing figure was installed in 1914.

The base is adorned by the carved figure of a woman standing on the bow of a ship, an olive branch in her raised right hand. Her lowered left hand holds a shield and sword steady at her side. To her right at the same level as the sword and shield, an eagle standing on a branch of oak leaves gazes up at her.

This monument is located on the west side of the Franklin Square Park and right next to 14th Street NW and halfway between I and K Streets NW. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the statue of Commodore John Barry.

Closest Metro Station: McPherson Square on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to Franklin Square.

FDR Wheelchair Sculpture – FDR Memorial

Sculpture of FDR Using a Wheelchair Similar to One He Actually Used - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

Sculpture of FDR Using a Wheelchair Similar to One He Actually Used - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

After the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial was dedicated in 1997, an additional sculpture of FDR was added near the entrance to the memorial of FDR sitting in a wheelchair similar to one he actually used. This additional statue was placed in the memorial in January 2001.

The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is located next to the Tidal Basin which is surrounded by Washington DC’s blooming cherry trees. In the photograph above a cherry tree with its blossoms is visible in the upper left corner.

Click FDR Memorial to see the main StationStart.com entry about the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial with links to additional entries about the memorial.

The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is located on the southwest edge of the Tidal Basin accessible by foot from the path around the edge of the Tidal Basin with another entrance on West Basin Drive SW in Washington DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the FDR Wheelchair Sculpture in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

FDR Books & More on Amazon

Closest Metro Station: The Smithsonian Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

The Presidential Seal – FDR Memorial

The Presidential Seal - Created by Sculptor Tom Hardy - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

The Presidential Seal - Created by Sculptor Tom Hardy - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

This sculpture named The Presidential Seal was created by sculptor Tom Hardy. This sculpture was created out of welded bronze.

The Presidential Seal is located in Room One of the FDR Memorial. The Seal appears in this sculpture as it did on March 4, 1933 when Franklin Delano Roosevelt was inaugurated as president for the first time.

Room One is designed to recall President Roosevelt’s first term. He entered office during the Great Depression and at a time when many people were suffering, afraid and had little in the way of hope for the future. But many people believed that the new president brought with him a sense of confidence and optimism and an ability to tap into the strength of the American people.

One inscription in Room One came from the president’s Fireside Chat on September 30, 1934:

No Country, however rich, can afford the waste of its human resources. Demoralization caused by vast unemployment is our greatest extravagance. Morally, it is the greatest menace to our social order.

Another inscription came from a campaign address in 1932:

In these days of difficulty, we Americans everywhere must and shall choose the path of social justice, the path of faith, the path of hope and the path of love toward our fellow men.

Click FDR Memorial to see the main StationStart.com entry about the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial with links to additional entries about the memorial.

The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is located on the southwest edge of the Tidal Basin accessible by foot from the path around the edge of the Tidal Basin with another entrance on West Basin Drive SW in Washington DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of The Presidential Seal in Room One of the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

FDR Books & More on Amazon

Closest Metro Station: The Smithsonian Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

The Fireside Chat – FDR Memorial

The Fireside Chat - Created by Sculptor Georg Segal - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

The Fireside Chat - Created by Sculptor Georg Segal - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

This sculpture named The Fireside Chat was created by sculptor George Segal. George Segal created two other sculptures for the FDR Memorial: The Breadline and The Rural Couple

The Fireside Chat is located in Room Two of the FDR Memorial. The lone barefoot man sits on a broken chair. The upper horizontal support between the left front and the left rear legs is missing. But he is engaged, leaning forward, eyes closed, hands clasped, as President Roosevelt talks to him through the radio on the small side table.

Room Two covers the time of the Great Depression, and this sculpture reflects the hope that many people felt that President Roosevelt would lead them through the difficult times.

One of the inscriptions in Room Two is from President Roosevelt’s Fireside Chat on April 14, 1938. It reads:

I never forget that I live in a house owned by all the American people and that I have been given their trust.

Click FDR Memorial to see the main StationStart.com entry about the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial with links to additional entries about the memorial.

The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is located on the southwest edge of the Tidal Basin accessible by foot from the path around the edge of the Tidal Basin with another entrance on West Basin Drive SW in Washington DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the sculpture The Fireside Chat in Room Two of the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

FDR Books & More on Amazon

Closest Metro Station: The Smithsonian Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

The Breadline – FDR Memorial

The Breadline - Created by Sculptor Georg Segal - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

The Breadline - Created by Sculptor Georg Segal - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

This sculpture named The Breadline was created by sculptor George Segal. George Segal created two other sculptures for the FDR Memorial: The Fireside Chat and The Rural Couple

The Breadline is located in Room Two of the FDR Memorial. The five figures in the sculpture, all male, all with eyes downcast and all dressed in long coats and hats as a defense against the cold, stand in line against a brick wall and wait for food that may be only bread. The windowless wooden door they all face remains closed in front of them.

Room Two covers the time of the Great Depression, and this sculpture reflects the difficulties encountered by many people.

The inscription partly above and partly to the left of this sculpture is from 1937. It reads:

I see one-third of a nation ill-housed, ill-clad, and ill-nourished. The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.

Click FDR Memorial to see the main StationStart.com entry about the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial with links to additional entries about the memorial.

The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is located on the southwest edge of the Tidal Basin accessible by foot from the path around the edge of the Tidal Basin with another entrance on West Basin Drive SW in Washington DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the sculpture The Breadline in Room Two of the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

FDR Books & More on Amazon

Closest Metro Station: The Smithsonian Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

The Rural Couple – FDR Memorial

The Rural Couple - Created by Sculptor Georg Segal - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

The Rural Couple - Created by Sculptor Georg Segal - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

This sculpture named The Rural Couple was created by sculptor George Segal. George Segal created two other sculptures for the FDR Memorial: The Fireside Chat and The Breadline

The sculpture is located in Room Two of the FDR Memorial. The figures are both mature and solemn with eyes downcast. The man stands and the woman sits in a wooden chair before what appears to be a barn wall made of rough hewn wood. To the couple’s right is a stable door with the upper half of the door swung open into a position flat against the barn wall. Only a dull, flat surface is visible through the open part of the door.

Room Two acknowledges and this sculpture reflects the privation of the Great Depression.

Click FDR Memorial to see the main StationStart.com entry about the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial with links to additional entries about the memorial.

The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is located on the southwest edge of the Tidal Basin accessible by foot from the path around the edge of the Tidal Basin with another entrance on West Basin Drive SW in Washington DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the sculpture The Rural Couple in Room Two of the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

FDR Books & More on Amazon

Closest Metro Station: The Smithsonian Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

Eleanor Roosevelt – FDR Memorial

Statue of Eleanor Roosevelt With UN Seal In the Background - Created by Sculptor Neil Estern - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

Statue of Eleanor Roosevelt With UN Seal In the Background - Created by Sculptor Neil Estern - Located in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

This sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt was created by sculptor Neil Estern. Neil Estern also created the seated figure of Franklin Delano Roosevelt with his dog Fala nearby.

The statue of Elanor Roosevelt is located in Room Four of the FDR Memorial. In the background is a United Nations seal. Eleanor Roosevelt was one first delegates from the United States to the UN.

Eleanor Roosevelt is in one respect first of First Ladies, as the first First Lady to be recognized in sculpture in a presidential memorial.

Room Four reflects President Roosevelt’s brief fourth term. He took the oath of office for the fourth time on January 20, 1945 and passed away a short time later on April 12, 1945 only days before the end of World War II in Europe.

Inscriptions in Room Four, from 1941:

Freedom of speech. Freedom of worship. Freedom from want. Freedom from fear.

From 1943:

Unless the peace that follows recognizes that the whole world is one neighborhood and does justice to the whole human race, the germs of another world war will remain as a constant threat to mankind.

From 1945 from an undelivered speech scheduled to be delivered on Thomas Jefferson Day, the day following President Roosevelt’s death:

More than an end to war, we want an end to the beginnings of all wars.

Click FDR Memorial to see the main StationStart.com entry about the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial with links to additional entries about the memorial.

The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is located on the southwest edge of the Tidal Basin accessible by foot from the path around the edge of the Tidal Basin with another entrance on West Basin Drive SW in Washington DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Eleanor Roosevelt Statute in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

Eleanor Roosevelt Books and More on Amazon

FDR Books & More on Amazon

Closest Metro Station: The Smithsonian Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

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