Posts belonging to Category 'Federal Triangle'

White House

White House - View of the North Side from Pennsylvania Avenue NW

White House - View of the North Side from Pennsylvania Avenue NW

Facts About the White House

  • The address is 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20500.
  • George Washington and Pierre L’Enfant (Washington city planner) selected the site.
  • Architect James Hoban’s design was selected from nine proposals.
  • Construction began in late 1792.
  • John Adams, the second president, was the first chief executive to occupy the White House when he and his wife Abigail moved there in 1800.
  • In 1805 Thomas Jefferson held a public open house following his inauguration.
  • There were fires in the White House in 1814 and 1929.
  • The interior of the White House was reconstructed while Harry Truman was president.
  • The stone exterior of the White House is the same as when it was originally constructed during the years 1792 to 1800.
  • There are 132 rooms in the White House and 35 bathrooms.
  • Although not apparent from the outside, the White House has 6 levels.
  • The White House has been known by a variety of names including:
    • President’s Palace
    • Presidential Mansion
    • President’s House
    • Executive Mansion
    • White House – used officially by Theodore Roosevelt in 1901

Tours of the White House are generally conducted Monday through Saturday. A tour can be arranged by contacting the Member of Congress from your district. Citizens of countries other than the United States will need to contact their embassy in Washington DC in order to make arrangements for a tour.

White House - View of the South Side and the South Lawn from E Street NW

White House - View of the South Side and the South Lawn from E Street NW

Both the north and south facing sides of the White House are easily recognizable. The north facing side appears on the back of the $20. The inauguration parade passes by this side of the White House, and this where official guests often arrive by car. The south facing side often appears in the news as the location where the president appears, often accompanied by various officials and dignitaries, and where ceremonies and events take place.

The White House is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC, and the north side is visible from Pennsylvania Avenue. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the sidewalk on Pennsylvania Avenue NW just in front of the White House. At this location you will be about 250 feet or 80 meters from the front of the White House.

Closest Metro Station (North Side): The Farragut West Metro Station and the McPherson Square Metro Station, both on the Blue and Orange Lines, are the nearest stations to the Pennsylvania Avenue side of the White House.

The south facing side of the White House and the south lawn is visible from E Street NW between South Place NW and East Executive Avenue NW. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the sidewalk on E Street NW from which the south facing side of the White House and the south lawn are visible. At this location you will be about 750 feet or 230 meters from the White House and about three times further away from it than you will be on the Pennsylvania Avenue NW side.

Closest Metro Station (South Side): The Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest station to the E Street NW location from which the south facing side of the White House can be seen. At the same time, the Farragut West Metro Station and the McPherson Square Metro Station, both on the Blue and Orange Lines and the Metro Center Station on the Red, Blue and Orange Lines are all just slightly further away than the Federal Triangle Station.

C-3PO Star Wars Costume

C-3PO Costume From Star Wars Episode 6, Return of the Jedi - Displayed at Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History

C-3PO Costume From Star Wars Episode 6, Return of the Jedi - Displayed at Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History

C-3PO’s Costume from Star Wars Episode 6 Return of the Jedi is on display at the Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History. The following information is from the museum’s sign accompanying the display.

Movie Costume
1983
C-3PO, an android played by actor Anthony Daniels, appears in all six of director George Lucas’s Star Wars films. This costume was worn in the sixth episode, Return of the Jedi.
Gift of Lucasfilm Ltd., through Howard Roffman

C-3PO’s costume is on display in the Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History. Click Museum of American History to see the StationStart.com entry about the museum and its location. Exhibits in the various Smithsonian Institution Museums do change from time to time, so that any specific item may not be on display at all times.

Closest Metro Station: The Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Constitution Avenue NW entrance to the Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History.

Abraham Lincoln Life Mask

Life Mask of Abraham Lincoln Made February 11, 1865 - Displayed at Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History

Life Mask of Abraham Lincoln Made February 11, 1865 - Displayed at Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History

Abraham Lincoln’s life mask is on display at the Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History. The following information is from the museum’s signs accompanying the display.

Mill’s Mask of Lincoln
Gift of Theodore Mills, the artist’s son, 1889
On February 11, 1865, about two months before his death, Lincoln permitted sculptor Clark Mills to make this life mask of his face. This was the second and last life mask made of Lincoln.

Written on His Face
The strain of the presidency was written on Abraham Lincoln’s face. His secretary, John Hay, remarked on the dramatic difference in Lincoln’s two life masks. He noted that the first (displayed earlier in the exhibition) “is a man of fifty-one, and young for his years. . . . It is a face full of life, of energy, of vivid aspiration. . . . The other is so sad and peaceful in its infinite repose . . . a look as of one on whom sorrow and care had done their worst without victory is on all the features.”

This life mask of Abraham Lincoln was on display in the Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History. Click Museum of American History to see the StationStart.com entry about the museum and its location. Exhibits in the various Smithsonian Institution Museums do change from time to time, so that any specific item may not be on display at all times.

Abraham Lincoln Books & More on Amazon

Closest Metro Station: The Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Constitution Avenue NW entrance to the Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History.

Benjamin Franklin Statue – Old Post Office Pavilion

Statue of Benjamin Franklin in Front of the Old Post Office Pavilion, Washington, DC

Statue of Benjamin Franklin in Front of the Old Post Office Pavilion, Washington, DC

This statute of Benjamin Franklin now stands in front of the Old Post Office Pavilion on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC. Words carved into the pedestal of the statue read:

 
 

Statue of Benjamin With the Old Post Office Pavilion in the Background

Statue of Benjamin With the Old Post Office Pavilion in the Background

Presented to the National Capital
By
Stilson Hutchins

 

 

Stilson Hutchins (1838 – 1912) was the founder of the Washington Post. A metal plaque attached to the pedestal of the statue reads:

Erected January 17th 1889
Ernst Plassman, Designer.
Jacques Jouvenal, Sculptor.
J.F. Manning, Designer of Pedestal.
Commissioners of District of Columbia,
W.B. Webb, S.E. Wheatley, C.W. Raymond.

The statue of Benjamin Franklin is located on the southeast corner of the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue NW and 12th Street NW, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the statue.

Closest Metro Station: The Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the Old Post Office Pavilion and the statue of Benjamin Franklin.

Casimir Pulaski Statue – Freedom Plaza

Equestrian Statute of Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski in Freedom Plaza, Washington, DC

Equestrian Statute of Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski in Freedom Plaza, Washington, DC

Casimir Pulaski was born in Poland. Benjamin Franklin met him in Paris and recruited him to fight in support of the colonies in the American Revolution. In 1777 he met General George Washington in Philadelphia. He went on to prove himself to be a valuable resource in the war against England. The plaque on the statue reads:

 
 
 

Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski

Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski

Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski

 

 1748 – 1779

The bronze equestrian statue of Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski, portrays the Revolutionary War hero in the uniform of a Polish Cavalry Commander. Born in Winiary, Poland on March 4, 1748 to a noble family, Pulaski gained prominence in Europe for his role in defending liberty in Poland. Excited by the struggle of the emerging American Republic, Pulaski joined in its fight for independence, arriving in Boston in July, 1777.

Pulaski was given a commission as Brigadier General and Chief of Cavalry in Command of All Cavalry of the American Forces. He was present at Germantown, Pennsylvania and led his legion at Haddonfield, New Jersey; Egg Harbor, New Jersey; Charleston, South Carolina; and Savanna, Georgia.
At Svanna, Pulaski was mortally wounded and was taken aboard the American brig, Wasp, where he died and was buried at sea on October 11, 1779. He was 31 years old.

The statue was designed by the sculptor Kazimierz Chodzinski and architect Albert P. Ross. It was erected in 1910.

The statue of Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski is located at the east end of Freedom Plaza near the intersection of 13th and E Streets NW, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the statue.

Closest Metro Station: Federal Triangle is the nearest Metro Station to Freedom Plaza and the statue of Brigadier General Casimir Pulaski.

Top Hat Belonging to Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln's Top Hat Worn to Ford's Theatre on April 14, 1865

Abraham Lincoln's Top Hat Worn to Ford's Theatre on April 14, 1865

Abraham Lincoln’s top hat is on display at the Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History. The following information is from the museum’s signs accompanying the display.

Lincoln’s Top Hat

Transfer from the War Department with permission from Mary Lincoln, 1867

At six feet four inches tall, Lincoln towered over most of his contemporaries. He chose to stand out even more by wearing high top hats. He acquired this hat from J. Y. Davis, a Washington hat maker. Lincoln had the black silk mourning band added in remembrance of his son Willie. The last time he wore this top hat was to go to Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865.

The Hat at the Smithsonian

After Lincoln’s assassination, the War Department preserved his hat and other material left at Ford’s Theatre. With permission from Mary Lincoln, the department gave the hat to the Patent Office, which, in 1867, transferred it to the Smithsonian Institution. Joseph Henry, the Secretary of the Smithsonian, ordered his staff not to exhibit the hat “under any circumstance, and not to mention the matter to any one, on account of there being so much excitement at the time.” It was immediately placed in a basement storage room.

The American public did not see the hat again until 1893, when the Smithsonian lent it to an exhibition hosted by the Lincoln Memorial Association. Today it is one of the Institution’s most treasured objects.

This top hat belonging to Abraham Lincoln is located in the Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History. Click Museum of American History to see the StationStart.com entry about the museum and its location. Exhibits in the various Smithsonian Institution Museums do change from time to time, so that any specific item may not be on display at all times.

Abraham Lincoln Books & More on Amazon

Closest Metro Station: The Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Constitution Avenue NW entrance to the Smithsonian Institution Museum of American History.

Freedom Plaza

Freedom Plaza in the Foreground - Looking Southeast Along Pennsylvania Avenue With The United States Capitol Visible In the Distance

Freedom Plaza in the Foreground - Looking Southeast Along Pennsylvania Avenue With The United States Capitol Visible In the Distance

Freedom Plaza, originally known as Western Plaza, was renamed to honor Martin Luther King, Jr.

In the photograph above the United States Capitol is visible at the far end of Pennsylvania Avenue. Also to the right of the Capitol and a good bit closer is the Old Post Office Pavilion with a tower that provides an excellent view of Freedom Plaza and most of Washington DC’s well known sites.

There is a metal inscription and model of Freedom Plaza on the top of the north wall not so far from the pool at the west end (near 14th Street NW). The wall is short, probably only about 18 inches high, so it is easy to see the model. The inscription above the model reads:

Western Plaza Pennsylvania Avenue

Western Plaza consists of a large raised terrace in which part of L’Enfant’s original 1791 plan for Washington, D.C. is rendered in black and white stone. At one end of the raised terrace is a pool. At the other is a shaded sitting area around a statute of General Pulaski.

Inscribed on the upper terrace are historic quotations about Washington. Low walls separate the plaza from the surrounding traffic. Eleven large urns rest on top of these walls and contain seasonal planting. The upper map terrace has a grass lawn where the mall occurs and inlaid bronze plans of the White House and the Capitol located at either end of Pennsylvania Avenue. The inlays illustrate L’Enfant’s intention to have these two buildings balance each other and symbolize two main branches of government. The siting of the Treasury in the 19th Century blocked the view of the White House and obscured this relationship.

L’Enfant’s plan of Washington combines two orders of scale. The giant order is the diagonal avenues that sometimes terminate in a building or a monument. This order characterizes the federal scale of the city. The minor order is the rectangular grid pattern of the local structure of the city.

Western Plaza acknowledges both orders since it is shaped by the rectangular grid of the local scale and is an element within the giant order of Pennsylvania Avenue.

Model of Freedom Plaza Located On the Low North Wall Near the Pool

Model of Freedom Plaza Located On the Low North Wall Near the Pool

The following references are to the model:
1. Pool
2. White House
3. Mall
4. L’Enfant’s Plan
5. Capitol
6. Pulaski Statute

Freedom Plaza is located between 13th and 14th Streets NW where Pennsylvania Avenue intersects those two streets. In fact Freedom Plaza is right where Pennsylvania Avenue would be if it were not been slightly rerouted in order to make room for the Plaza. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of Freedom Plaza.

Closest Metro Station: The Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to Freedom Plaza, although in The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown, he does make something of the fact that the Metro Center Metro Station on the Blue, Orange and Red Lines is also nearby.

Lost Symbol by Dan Brown: Freedom Plaza is mentioned in chapters 75, 76, 78 and 79.

Second Division Memorial

Flaming, Golden Sword - Second Division Memorial - Near Ellipse, White House and Washington Monument

Flaming, Golden Sword - Second Division Memorial - Near Ellipse, White House and Washington Monument

Memorial to the Second Infantry Division of the United States Army

Memorial to the Second Infantry Division of the United States Army

The Second Infantry Division Memorial is located between the White House and the Washington Monument and is close to both. 

This memorial was dedicated in 1936 to honor those in the division who lost their lives in World War I. The flaming, golden sword is held aloft, symbolically blocking the Germans. James Earle Fraser was the sculptor. The inscription under the sword reads, “To Our Dead, 1917-1919.”

A later addition on the west side (left in the photograph) honors members of the division who died in World War II, and an addition of the east side (right in the photograph) honors those who died in the Korean Conflict. The memorial was dedicated again in 1963.

Insignia of the Second Infantry Division Carved Into Cross Guard of Sword

Insignia of the Second Infantry Division Carved Into Cross Guard of Sword

The insignia of the Second Infantry Division of the United States Army appears in the center of the sword’s cross-guard.

The Second Division Memorial is located just outside the Ellipse and between the White House and the Washington Monument near the intersection of Constitution Avenue NW and 17th Street NW. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Second Division Memorial.

Closest Metro Station: The Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Second Division Memorial.

Old Post Office Pavilion

Old Post Office Pavilion As Viewed Diagonally Across the Intersection of 12th Street NW and Pennsylvania Avenue NW

Old Post Office Pavilion As Viewed Diagonally Across the Intersection of 12th Street NW and Pennsylvania Avenue NW

The Old Post Office Pavilion provides:
- One of the best views in Washington;
- A food court with lots of choices;
- Many small shops;
- Convenient location near the Federal Triangle Metro Station.

Food Court and Shops In the Old Post Office Pavilion

Food Court and Shops In the Old Post Office Pavilion

The Old Post Office Pavilion is one of Washington DC’s hidden and often overlooked gems. It was built in the 1890′s, and at 315 feet, it was Washington’s tallest building. Today there are only two buildings in Washington that are taller, the Washington Monument at 555 feet and the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception at 329 feet.

The core of the building is a huge, many stories tall enclosed space with a glass ceiling/roof. Originally the building housed the city post office, and it was also used as the offices of the Postmaster General and the US Post Office.

The building still contains offices, but it has several things that are of interest to those who want to enjoy Washington DC. First the tower provides an unobstructed view in every direction. Most of Washington’s most popular sites are visible from the tower.

View From the Old Post Office Tower Looking West

View From the Old Post Office Tower Looking West

I know these images are too small to see any detail in most of buildings, but still this does give an idea of the view looking west from the Old Post Office Tower. I have identified some of the features below.

Washington Sites As Seen From the Old Post Office Tower

Washington Sites As Seen From the Old Post Office Tower

1. Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History.
2. Washington Monument.
3. National World War II Memorial.
4. Custis-Lee Mansion in Arlington Cemetery.
5. Gravesite of John Fitzgerald Kennedy.
6. Arlington Memorial Bridge with the Lincoln Memorial on the Washington DC side of the Potomac and Arlington Cemetery on the Virginia side.
7. Lincoln Memorial.
8. John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
9. White House obscured to some extent because the Treasury Building blocks a part of the view.
10. Freedom Plaza.
11. Washington National Cathedral With Grotesque of Darth Vader.

The lower two floor contain a food court as well as a good number of stores. Many of the stores have a focus on souvenirs, but as it turns out souvenirs are not all that difficult to find in Washington.

The Old Post Office Pavilion is located at 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Old Post Office Pavilion

Closest Metro Station: The Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Old Post Office. There is an has an exit just across 12th Street from the Old Post Office.

Lost Symbol by Dan Brown: Several of the sites in the photo above are mentioned in this book.
2. Washington Monument mentioned in chapters 3, 6, 128, 129, 131, 132 and the Epilogue.
10. Freedom Plaza mentioned in chapters 75, 76, 78 and 79.
11. Washington National Cathedral With Grotesque of Darth Vader mentioned in chapters 79, 82, 89, 91, 93, 123 and 130.

Alexander Calder – The Gwenfritz

Alexander Calder Stabile (Sculpture) The Gwenfritz

Alexander Calder Stabile (Sculpture) The Gwenfritz Located Near the Museum of American History at the Intersection of 14th Street NW and Constitution Avenue NW.

This sculpture by Alexander Calder is located on the grounds of the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History. There is an inscription in granite near the sculpture and a plaque on the stone circle surrounding the sculpture that provide information about the work.

The granite marker reads:

STABILE
by Alexander Calder
1968
Gift of the Morris and
Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation

The plaque reads:

The GWENFRITZ
by Alexander Calder
American (1898-1976)

This stabile, named for Mrs. Gwendolyn Cafritz, is one of the largest and most important produced during Alexander Calder’s career. The 35-ton sculpture was designed and fabricated in France and shipped here for installation in June 1969.

Calder was born in Philadelphia, the son and grandson of sculptors. He preferred to train in mechanical engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology, however, before going to New York in 1923 to study painting a drawing at the Art Students’ League. While living in Paris from 1926 to 1938, Calder made a miniature circus of animated wire figures and gave performances that brought him renown. His first mobiles, so named by his friend Marcel Duchamp, appeared in 1931.

The East Wing of the National Gallery of Art, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, and the National Museum of American Art also display Calder sculptures.

Gift of the Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation.

The Alexander Calder Stabile GWENFRITZ is located on the southwest corner at the intersection of 14th Street NW and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Alexander Calder Stabile GWENFRITZ near the Museum of American History.

Closest Metro Station: The Metro Station nearest to The Gwenfritz is the Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines.

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