Posts belonging to Category 'Capitol South'

Longworth House Office Building

Longworth House Office Building, 15 Independence Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20515

Longworth House Office Building, 15 Independence Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20515

The Longworth House Office Building has a floor area of just under 600,000 square feet and is the smallest of the three House Office Buildings. It was built in the Neo-Classical Revival style and was finished in 1933.

The large assembly room in this building was used in 1949 and 1950 as the meeting chamber for the House of Representatives while the chamber in the Capitol was undergoing remodeling.

The Longworth House Office Building is located at 15 Independence Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20515. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Longworth House Office Building.

Closest Metro Station: The Capitol South Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Longworth House Office Building.

Cannon House Office Building

Cannon House Office Building, 283 1st Street Southeast, Washington, DC

Cannon House Office Building, 283 1st Street Southeast, Washington, DC

The Cannon House Office Building, the oldest of the congressional office buildings, was built between 1905 and 1908. The building with an area of 671,921 square feet is built in the Beaux Arts architectural style.

The photograph above was taken near the intersection of Independence Avenue SE and 1st Street SE. The main entrance is located at the intersection of Independence Avenue SE and New Jersey Avenue SE. Inside the main entrance is the Rotunda that is just over 57 feet in diameter.

Cannon House Office Building

Cannon House Office Building

The Cannon House Office Building is located at 283 1st Street Southeast, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Cannon House Office Building.

Closest Metro Station: The Capitol South Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Cannon House Office Building.

Real World DC: In Episode 8 Mike goes to room 501 of the Cannon House Office Building to meet with his congressman Jared Polis, the Congressman from Colorado’s 2nd district.

United States Capitol – National Statuary Hall

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Eagle With Wings Spread On South Wall Below Sculpture of Liberty, Eagle and Snake

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Eagle With Wings Spread On South Wall Below Sculpture of Liberty, Eagle and Snake

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Sculpture of Liberty, Eagle and Snake On South Wall

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Sculpture of Liberty, Eagle and Snake On South Wall

The National Statuary Hall is located in the United States Capitol and is south of the Rotunda. This was originally constructed as the chamber for the House of Representatives and was used as such after construction was completed in 1819. The semicircular room with its curved ceiling caused echoes that made it difficult to conduct business in the chamber. The House of Representatives moved into its current chamber in 1857.

The room is now used for the display of statuary. Each state was asked to contribute two statutes of prominent people, and many of those statutes are displayed in this room.

Visitor access to the National Statuary Hall is through the US Capitol Visitor Center. Click United States Capitol to see the StationStart.com entry about the United States Capitol and the US Capitol Visitor Center.

The United States Capitol is located at 100 Constitution Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the United States Capitol Visitor Center.

Closest Metro Station: Capitol South on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the United States Capitol.

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Some of the Sculptures Provided by the Various States

United States Capitol - National Statuary Hall - Some of the Sculptures Provided by the Various States

United States Capitol and US Capitol Visitor Center

United States Capitol - East Side - Photograph Taken from First Street Where It Changes From NE to SE

United States Capitol - East Side - Photograph Taken from First Street Where It Changes From NE to SE

The United States Capitol is located in what used to be the center of Washington DC (before a portion of the city’s land was returned to Virginia).

The Capitol provides meeting chambers for the two legislative bodies of the United States Government, the United States Senate and the House of Representatives. Historically the building provided space for other functions including chambers for the Supreme Court and room for the Library of Congress. Both of these functions have now been moved to their own buildings. Click Supreme Court to see the StationStart.com entry about the United States Supreme Court. Click Library of Congress to see the StationStart.com entry about the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress.

There are many things to see and experience at the Capitol that will be covered in additional entries at StationStart.com. When those entries are added, links to them will be added to the bottom of this entry.

Click United States Capitol to visit the United States Capitol (The Architect of the Capitol) website.

United States Capitol and Visitor Center Entrance - The Below Grade Visitor Center on the East Side of the Capitol is Accessible by Stairs or Ramp

United States Capitol and Visitor Center Entrance - The Below Grade Visitor Center on the East Side of the Capitol is Accessible by Stairs or Ramp

The United States Capitol is located at 100 Constitution Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the United States Capitol Visitor Center.

Closest Metro Station: Capitol South on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the United States Capitol.

Lost Symbol by Dan Brown: The United States Capitol and the associated Visitor Center are mentioned many, many times, in chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 48, 49, 50, 61, 62, 64, 69, 73, 74, 78, 80, 83, 91, 111, 117, 128, 129, 131, 132, 133 and the Epilogue. Facts from the book: Pierre L’Enfant, the designer of Washington, placed the Capitol on a raised area in Washington the he described as, “a pedestal waiting for a monument.” The building is 750 feet wide and 350 feet deep. It contains more than 16 acres of floor space divided among 541 rooms. George Washington laid the Capitol’s cornerstone on September 18, 1793. The Statue of Liberty could stand within the space provided by the Capitol Rotunda.

Other StationStart.com entries that provide additional information about the United States Capitol.

Click Apotheosis of Washington to see the StationStart.com entry about the Apotheosis of Washington, the massive painting on the ceiling of the Rotunda.

Click National Statuary Hall to see the StationStart.com entry about the National Statuary Hall located in the Capitol and near the Rotunda.

Click Statute of Freedom to see the StationStart.com entry about the female figure located atop the United States Capitol.

Capitol Visitor Center Sign - Tunnel to the Library of Congress - Possibly of Interest to Readers of The Lost Symbol

Capitol Visitor Center Sign - Tunnel to the Library of Congress - Possibly of Interest to Readers of The Lost Symbol

United States Capitol – Statute of Freedom

Plaster Model for Statute of Freedom - Model Located in the United States Capitol Visitor Center

Plaster Model for Statute of Freedom - Model Located in the United States Capitol Visitor Center

Crowning the United States Capitol is the Statute of Freedom by Thomas Crawford. The female figure, originally known as the Freedom Triumphant in War and Peace, is 19.5 feet tall and weighs 15,000 pounds (7.5 tons, 6,800 kg). In her right hand she grasps the pommel and grip of a sheathed sword. The shield of the United States is held steady in her left hand which also holds a laurel wreath.

Statute of Freedom Located Atop the United States Capitol Dome

Statute of Freedom Located Atop the United States Capitol Dome

Thomas Crawford created the full size plaster model of the statute in Rome, but he died in 1857 while the model was still in his studio. The six crates containing the plaster model all made it to Washington by March 1859. By late 1862 the statute had been cast in bronze in sections by Clark Mills, had been assembled and was on display on the capitol grounds. The last of the sections was installed in place atop the Capitol dome on December 2, 1963.

The plaster model is now on display in the Capitol Visitor Center. Click United States Capitol to see the StationStart.com entry about the United States Capitol.

The United States Capitol is located at 100 Constitution Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Statute of Freedom.

Closest Metro Station: Capitol South on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the United States Capitol.

Library of Congress – Jefferson Building

Library of Congress - Jefferson Building - Photograph taken from Southwest Corner of the Intersection of Independence Avenue SE and 1st Street SE

Library of Congress - Jefferson Building - Photograph taken from Southwest Corner of the Intersection of Independence Avenue SE and 1st Street SE

The Library of Congress consists of three buildings, but the first of those buildings, the Thomas Jefferson Building, is often referred to as the Library of Congress. The other buildings are the Adams Building and the Madison Building. Click Adams Building to see the StationStart.com entry about that building.

The Jefferson Building was constructed during the years 1988 through 1894. 1.7 million people visit the Library of Congress each year. The Library of Congress Experience provides visitors with an interactive experience including the opportunity to turn pages of books from Thomas Jefferson’s library, inspect pages from the Gutenberg Bible, and view edits made in the rough draft of the Declaration of Independence.

Library of Congress - Jefferson Building - Main Entrance Facing 1st Street SE

Library of Congress - Jefferson Building - Main Entrance Facing 1st Street SE

Visitors may also visit the Great Hall, the Main Reading Room and other areas. Click Library of Congress to visit the library’s website.

The Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress is located on 1st Street SE between Independence Avenue and East Capitol Street. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building. 

Closest Metro Station: The Capitol South Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest to the Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress.

Lost Symbol by Dan Brown: The Library of Congress, occasionally referred to as the Jefferson Building, is mentioned in Chapters 46, 54, 55, 58, 59, 61, 69, 73, 80.

Facts from The Lost Symbol: The Library of Congress houses what some have called the most beautiful room in the world. The library contains 500 miles of shelves. It expands at the rate of 10,000 items per day. It contains Thomas Jefferson’s personal collection of books. It was one of the first buildings in Washington with electric lights. An underground tunnel links the Jefferson Building and the United States Capitol.

Folger Shakespeare Library – Puck Sculpture

Puck From William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream on West Lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Puck From William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream on West Lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library

On the west lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library is a marble sculpture of Puck (also known as Robin Goodfellow) . This character is from William Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Natural Setting For Puck At the Head of a Fountain on West Lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Natural Setting For Puck At the Head of a Fountain on West Lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Puck, Oberon’s jester, uses magic to create mischief through deliberate efforts and inadvertent mistakes. Puck is both a good natured and sometimes cruel sprite known to some as a hobgoblin.

In Act 3, Scene 2 of A Midsummer’s Night Dream Puck observes: “Lord, what fools these mortals be!”

The 1932 sculpture by Brenda Putnam has been repaired and now has a silver sheen.

Click Bas Relief Marble Sculptures to see the StationStart.com entry about the sculpted scenes from nine of William Shakespeare’s plays that line the front of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Click Folger Shakespeare Library to see the StationStart.com entry about the library and Elizabethan Theatre.

The Folger Shakespeare Library is located at 201 East Capitol Street SE, Washington, DC, and Puck is the central figure in a fountain at the west end of the building. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the sculpture of Puck at the west end of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Closest Metro Station: The Capital South Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Folger Shakespeare Library – Marble Sculpture

Folger Shakespeare Library - Marble Bas Relief Sculpture Depicting Macbeth with the Three Witches

Folger Shakespeare Library - Marble Bas Relief Sculpture Depicting Macbeth with the Three Witches

The Folger Shakespeare Library has nine large sculptures carved in white Georgia marble along the front of the building. These are the work of John Gregory (1879 – 1958). Each bas relief sculpture depicts a scene from one of William Shakespeare’s plays.

The Nine Marble Bas Relief Sculptures Along the Front of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Nine Marble Nine Bas Relief Sculptures Along the Front of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Going left to right across the front of the building and also from left to right in the 3 by 3 grid above starting with the top row:

1. A Midsummer Night’s Dream
2. Romeo and Juliet
3. The Merchant of Venice
4. Macbeth
5. Julius Caesar
6. King Lear
7. Richard III
8. Hamlet
9. Henry IV, Part I

Click Puck Sculpture to see the StationStart.com entry about the sculpture on the west lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library of the character from William Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Click Folger Shakespeare Library to see the StationStart.com entry about the library and Elizabethan Theatre.

The Folger Shakespeare Library is located at 201 East Capitol Street SE, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Folger Shakespeare Library and the Elizabethan Theatre.

Closest Metro Station: The Capital South Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Folger Shakespeare Library

Folger Shakespeare Library and Elizabethan Theatre, 201 East Capitol Street SE, Washington, DC

Folger Shakespeare Library and Elizabethan Theatre, 201 East Capitol Street SE, Washington, DC. Notice the United States Capitol in the Background.

The Folger Shakespeare Library has the largest collection of Shakespeare materials in the world. In addition the building houses the Elizabethan Theatre with regularly scheduled performances of Shakespeare’s plays and other works.

The Folger is near the United States Capitol, the Supreme Court and the Library of Congress. The Capitol is visible on the right in the photograph above.

Click Bas Relief Marble Sculptures to see the StationStart.com entry about the sculpted scenes from nine of William Shakespeare’s plays that line the front of the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Click Puck Sculpture to see the StationStart.com entry about the sculpture on the west lawn of the Folger Shakespeare Library of the character from William Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

The Folger Shakespeare Library is located at 201 East Capitol Street SE, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Folger Shakespeare Library and the Elizabethan Theatre.

Closest Metro Station: The Capital South Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Lost Symbol by Dan Brown: The Folger Shakespeare Library is mentioned in chapter 73.

Botanic Garden

United States Botanic Garden, One of the Locations Used by Dan Brown in The Lost Symbol

United States Botanic Garden, One of the Locations Used by Dan Brown in The Lost Symbol

The United States Botanic Garden is located on the southwest corner of the United States Capitol grounds. The garden is run by the Congress of the United States and provides a unexpected and fascinating museum filled with living plants right in the middle of Washington DC.

Visitors pass into the Garden Court when they enter the building. Behind that is the jungle/rainforest area. Around there outside edge of the building are many separate rooms, each with a different habitat. There are areas for rare and endangered plants, desert plants and plants from Hawaii.

The Botanic Garden plays an important role in The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown.

US Botanic Garden's Wood Replica of the Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building

US Botanic Garden's Wood Replica of the Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building

Often from the end of November through early January the Botanic Garden has displayed replicas of many of Washington’s government buildings. These replicas are made exclusively from wood and other plant materials. Shown here is a replica of the Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building. Like the US Botanic Garden, the Thomas Jefferson Building plays an important role in The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown.

The United States Botanic Garden is located at 100 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20001. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the United States Botanic Garden.

Closest Metro Station: The Capitol South Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is nearest to the US Botanic Garden.

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