United States Capitol and US Capitol Visitor Center

United States Capitol - East Side - Photograph Taken from First Street Where It Changes From NE to SE

United States Capitol - East Side - Photograph Taken from First Street Where It Changes From NE to SE

The United States Capitol is located in what used to be the center of Washington DC (before a portion of the city’s land was returned to Virginia).

The Capitol provides meeting chambers for the two legislative bodies of the United States Government, the United States Senate and the House of Representatives. Historically the building provided space for other functions including chambers for the Supreme Court and room for the Library of Congress. Both of these functions have now been moved to their own buildings. Click Supreme Court to see the StationStart.com entry about the United States Supreme Court. Click Library of Congress to see the StationStart.com entry about the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress.

There are many things to see and experience at the Capitol that will be covered in additional entries at StationStart.com. When those entries are added, links to them will be added to the bottom of this entry.

Click United States Capitol to visit the United States Capitol (The Architect of the Capitol) website.

United States Capitol and Visitor Center Entrance - The Below Grade Visitor Center on the East Side of the Capitol is Accessible by Stairs or Ramp

United States Capitol and Visitor Center Entrance - The Below Grade Visitor Center on the East Side of the Capitol is Accessible by Stairs or Ramp

The United States Capitol is located at 100 Constitution Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the United States Capitol Visitor Center.

Closest Metro Station: Capitol South on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest Metro Station to the United States Capitol.

Lost Symbol by Dan Brown: The United States Capitol and the associated Visitor Center are mentioned many, many times, in chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 41, 42, 43, 44, 46, 48, 49, 50, 61, 62, 64, 69, 73, 74, 78, 80, 83, 91, 111, 117, 128, 129, 131, 132, 133 and the Epilogue. Facts from the book: Pierre L’Enfant, the designer of Washington, placed the Capitol on a raised area in Washington the he described as, “a pedestal waiting for a monument.” The building is 750 feet wide and 350 feet deep. It contains more than 16 acres of floor space divided among 541 rooms. George Washington laid the Capitol’s cornerstone on September 18, 1793. The Statue of Liberty could stand within the space provided by the Capitol Rotunda.

Other StationStart.com entries that provide additional information about the United States Capitol.

Click Apotheosis of Washington to see the StationStart.com entry about the Apotheosis of Washington, the massive painting on the ceiling of the Rotunda.

Click National Statuary Hall to see the StationStart.com entry about the National Statuary Hall located in the Capitol and near the Rotunda.

Click Statute of Freedom to see the StationStart.com entry about the female figure located atop the United States Capitol.

Capitol Visitor Center Sign - Tunnel to the Library of Congress - Possibly of Interest to Readers of The Lost Symbol

Capitol Visitor Center Sign - Tunnel to the Library of Congress - Possibly of Interest to Readers of The Lost Symbol

4 comments

  1. Jeff says:

    I don’t know about the size, but the US Capitol gift shop sells replicas of the Statute of Freedom. Link:

    US Capitol Gift Shop.

  2. pamla credo-hayes says:

    I want to purchase a small 3″ Statute of Freedom–the on top the capitol for a group of my students. How can i accomplish this? thank you.


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