Women’s Titanic Memorial – Washington DC

Women’s Titanic Memorial – Washington DC – With Colorful Evening Sky

Women’s Titanic Memorial – Washington DC – With Colorful Evening Sky

The Women’s Titanic Memorial is located at the southern end of Washington Channel Park just outside Fort McNair in Southwest Washington, DC.

There is an engraving on the front of the base of the memorial. The letters on the memorial are all capitals, and there is no punctuation. In the following quotation, some letters have been converted to lower case, and punctuation has been added.

To the brave men who perished in the wreck of the Titanic April 15, 1912. They gave their lives that women and children might be saved.

Erected by the Women of America

An engraving on the back of the base of the memorial reads:

TO THE YOUNG AND THE OLD

THE RICH AND THE POOR

THE IGNORNAT AND THE LEARNED

ALL

WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES NOBLY

TO SAVE WOMEN AND CHILDREN

The memorial was designed by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. Born into one wealthy family, during the summers she lived at the Vanderbilt family mansion, The Breakers, in Newport, Rhode Island. She married Harry Payne Whitney and into a second wealthy family. She studied art, became a sculptor and worked to help women succeed in art.

Women’s Titanic Memorial – Looking South

Women’s Titanic Memorial – Looking South

The memorial was carved by John Horrigan of Quincy, Massachusetts. He sculpted many other statutes including the Continental Soldier at Valley Forge. That sculpture was cast in bronze from a model by Horrigan. It was designed to represent members of the Continental Army from the state of New Jersey. It was placed in Valley Forge, PA upon the site that had been occupied by the New Jersey Brigade.

Interestingly enough the scene from the movie Titanic (directed by James Cameron) with Leonardo DiCaprio (as Jack Dawson) and Kate Winslet (as Rose DeWitt Bukater) standing at the bow of the Titanic is quite reminiscent of this memorial. This concept of taking flight at the front of the ship with both arms spread wide is similar enough to this figure that the idea for the scene may have been suggested by the statute in this memorial.

The Women’s Titanic Memorial is located at the southern end of Washington Channel Park at the point where the western end of P Street SW comes to a dead end one block to the west of the intersection of 4th and P Streets, SW, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of Titanic Memorial, Washington Channel Park, Washington, DC.

Closest Metro Station: The Waterfront-SEU Metro Station on the Green Line is nearest to the Women’s Titanic Memorial.

The Daguerre Monument by Jonathan Scott Hartley

The Daguerre Monument - Smithsonian Institution National Portrait Gallery in the Background

The Daguerre Monument - Smithsonian Institution National Portrait Gallery in the Background

This sculpture is located on the grounds of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery.

A plaque near the monument provides following information:

The Daguerre Monument

The French artist Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre (1787-1851) became interested in the 1820s in trying to capture images photographically. In August 1839 his “Daguerreotype” technique–fixing an image on a light-sensitive, polished silver plate–was announced to the public. This was the first photographic process to be used widely in Europe and the United States.

In 1890 the Professional Photographers of America donated this monument to Daguerre, by the American sculptor Jonathan Scott Hartley, to the American people. The bronze figure was cast by the Henry-Bonnard Bronze Company of New York. Placed in the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum Building (now known as the Arts and Industries Building) to celebrate the first half-century of photography, the monument was displayed on the Mall from 1897 to 1969.

The rededication of the Daguerre Monument in 1989 was sponsored by the Professional Photographers of America in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of photography.

The inscription on the monument reads:

Photography, the electric telegraph, and the steam engine are the three great discoveries of the age. No five centuries in human progress can show such strides as these.

The Daguerre Monument is located on the grounds of the National Portrait Gallery near the southeast corner of the building. The National Portrait Gallery is located at 801 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Daguerre Monument.

Closest Metro Station: The Gallery Place-Chinatown Metro Station on the Red Line is nearest to the Portrait Gallery.

Modern Head Sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein

Modern Head Sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein

Modern Head Sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein

This sculpture is located on the grounds of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery. But on September 11, 2001 it was located in New York City only one block from the World Trade Center when terrorists flew one commercial airliner into each of the World Trade Center’s towers.

This sculpture survived the attacks of 9/11, and soon after that it was moved.

Modern Head - Smithsonian Informational Sign

Modern Head - Smithsonian Informational Sign

A plaque on the fence by the sculpture provides information about it. The text is set out below.

Roy Lichtenstein
born New York City 1923-died New York City 1997

Modern Head
conceived 1974
fabricated 1989-1990 by Lippincott Inc., edition I/I
painted stainless steel

Gift of Jeffrey H. Loria in loving memory of his sister, Harriet Loria Popowitz.

Roy Lichtenstein began creating his Modern Head series in the late 1960s with the idea that man can be made to look like a machine and the image manufactured by an industrial source. This concept pervaded the artist’s work throughout his career. In Modern Head he referenced the flat planes, precision, and abstract geometric forms associated with the 1930s art deco architecture and design.

Modern Head was installed in 1996 in Battery Park City, one block from the World Trade Center, by the Public Art Fund of New York City (top photo). The sculpture survived the destruction of 9/11 with only surface scratches and became a memo board for the FBI during its ensuing investigations (bottom photo). Note the white ash on the base and the windows blown out of the building in the background of the photograph taken by insurance agent Michael Fischman on September 21st. The sculpture was removed on November 9, 2001, for its protection.

Modern Head is located on the grounds of the National Portrait Gallery near the southwest corner of the building. The National Portrait Gallery is located at 801 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Modern Head Sculpture by Roy Lichtenstein.

Closest Metro Station: The Gallery Place-Chinatown Metro Station on the Red Line is nearest to the Portrait Gallery.

National Portrait Gallery

Smithsonian Institution's National Portrait Gallery, 801 F Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20004

Smithsonian Institution's National Portrait Gallery, 801 F Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20004

The Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery focuses on people who have had an impact on the culture and history of the United States. In addition to politicians and presidents there are portraits of entertainers, sports figures, political activists, champions and scoundrels.

The National Portrait Gallery always has several galleries filled with new exhibits. In addition to these new exhibits, there are many galleries that house the museum’s permanent exhibits. Permanent exhibits include:

  • America’s Presidents
  • American Origins, 1600-1900
  • Bravo! (performing arts including stage and circus)
  • Champions (sports figures)
  • Jo Davidson – Biographer in Bronze
  • The Struggle for Justice
  • Twentieth Century Americans

America’s Presidents Exhibit

The America’s Presidents exhibit is a complete collection of portraits of the presidents. The exhibit includes the Lansdowne portrait of George Washington by Gilbert Stuart and the cracked plate photograph of Abraham Lincoln. George Washington (1st president), Andrew Jackson (7th president), Abraham Lincoln (16th president), Theodore Roosevelt (26th president) and Franklin Delano Roosevelt (32nd president) all had great impact on the history of the United States and receive greater coverage in this exhibit.

American Origins, 1600-1900

The American Origins exhibit consists of seventeen galleries and small spaces. Included are portraits of Queen Elizabeth I of England, Pocahontas, Powhatan (chief of the Algonquian federation of Indians in Virginia), E Tow Oh Koam (Iroquois leader), Ho Nee Yeath Taw No Row (Mohawk leader), Phillis Wheatley (slave turned successful writer), Olaudah Equiano (slave turned abolitionist), Anne Catharine Hoof Green (managed the Maryland Gazette that covered events leading to the American Revolution), Samuel Seabury (a religious leader favoring reconciliation with Great Britain in 1774), Thomas Jefferson, Richard Henry Lee (delegate to the Second Continental Congress), Horatio Gates (a British soldier later appointed as a brigadier general in the Continental army), Marquis de Lafayette, Thayendanegea – Joseph Brant (a chief who encouraged Iroquois to fight against the Americans) and hundreds more.

Jo Davidson – Biographer in Bronze

This exhibit includes 14 sculptures including John Martin (artist, painter), Lincoln Steffens (journalist with an interest in political corruption, muckraker, political philosopher with some enthusiasm for Communism), Gertrude Stein (an American writer who lived in Paris) and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

The Struggle for Justice

This exhibit focuses on people who worked for establishing civil rights for disenfranchised or marginalized groups. Included are portraits of Lucretia Mott (women’s rights), Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton (women’s rights), Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, Andrew Carnegie, W.E.B. Du Bois, Carrie Chapman Catt, George Washington Carver, Thurgood Marshall, Earl Warren, Rosa Parks and many others.

Click National Portrait Gallery Website to visit the website of the Smithsonian Institution National Portrait Gallery.

The National Portrait Gallery is located at 801 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery.

Closest Metro Station: The Gallery Place-Chinatown Metro Station on the Red Line is nearest to the Portrait Gallery.

White House

White House - View of the North Side from Pennsylvania Avenue NW

White House - View of the North Side from Pennsylvania Avenue NW

Facts About the White House

  • The address is 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20500.
  • George Washington and Pierre L’Enfant (Washington city planner) selected the site.
  • Architect James Hoban’s design was selected from nine proposals.
  • Construction began in late 1792.
  • John Adams, the second president, was the first chief executive to occupy the White House when he and his wife Abigail moved there in 1800.
  • In 1805 Thomas Jefferson held a public open house following his inauguration.
  • There were fires in the White House in 1814 and 1929.
  • The interior of the White House was reconstructed while Harry Truman was president.
  • The stone exterior of the White House is the same as when it was originally constructed during the years 1792 to 1800.
  • There are 132 rooms in the White House and 35 bathrooms.
  • Although not apparent from the outside, the White House has 6 levels.
  • The White House has been known by a variety of names including:
    • President’s Palace
    • Presidential Mansion
    • President’s House
    • Executive Mansion
    • White House – used officially by Theodore Roosevelt in 1901

Tours of the White House are generally conducted Monday through Saturday. A tour can be arranged by contacting the Member of Congress from your district. Citizens of countries other than the United States will need to contact their embassy in Washington DC in order to make arrangements for a tour.

White House - View of the South Side and the South Lawn from E Street NW

White House - View of the South Side and the South Lawn from E Street NW

Both the north and south facing sides of the White House are easily recognizable. The north facing side appears on the back of the $20. The inauguration parade passes by this side of the White House, and this where official guests often arrive by car. The south facing side often appears in the news as the location where the president appears, often accompanied by various officials and dignitaries, and where ceremonies and events take place.

The White House is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC, and the north side is visible from Pennsylvania Avenue. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the sidewalk on Pennsylvania Avenue NW just in front of the White House. At this location you will be about 250 feet or 80 meters from the front of the White House.

Closest Metro Station (North Side): The Farragut West Metro Station and the McPherson Square Metro Station, both on the Blue and Orange Lines, are the nearest stations to the Pennsylvania Avenue side of the White House.

The south facing side of the White House and the south lawn is visible from E Street NW between South Place NW and East Executive Avenue NW. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the sidewalk on E Street NW from which the south facing side of the White House and the south lawn are visible. At this location you will be about 750 feet or 230 meters from the White House and about three times further away from it than you will be on the Pennsylvania Avenue NW side.

Closest Metro Station (South Side): The Federal Triangle Metro Station on the Blue and Orange Lines is the nearest station to the E Street NW location from which the south facing side of the White House can be seen. At the same time, the Farragut West Metro Station and the McPherson Square Metro Station, both on the Blue and Orange Lines and the Metro Center Station on the Red, Blue and Orange Lines are all just slightly further away than the Federal Triangle Station.

Metal Face Sculpture

Silver Metal Face Sculpture With Black Metal Rim Glasses

Silver Metal Face Sculpture With Black Metal Rim Glasses

This 6 foot high metal face sculpture is attached to the brick on the second floor of the building located at 1615 17th Street NW, Washington, DC. The sculpture includes silver metal lips, part of a chin, the nose, cheeks, eyes and eyebrows. There are also black metal glasses frames and gray lenses made of plastic or glass. At the top and taking the same shape as the tops of the eyebrows is a line of neon lights.

Metal Face Sculpture - Second Floor, 1615 17th Street NW

Metal Face Sculpture - Second Floor, 1615 17th Street NW

The building is located on the southeast corner of the intersection of Corcoran and 17th Streets NW. The sculpture is on the side of the building facing Corcoran Street.

Located on the second floor of 1615 17th Street NW is Dupont Optical. And in the windows of Dupont Optical’s offices are two quite interesting sculptures. In the window closer to Corcoran Street is a white hand holding an eyeball with a hazel or brown iris. In the next window is a black hand holding an eyeball with a green iris with a touch of yellow toward the pupil.

Disembodied Hand Supporting an Eyeball with a Brown or Hazel Iris

Disembodied Hand Supporting an Eyeball with a Brown or Hazel Iris

Disembodied Hand Supporting an Eyeball with a Green and Yellow Iris

Disembodied Hand Supporting an Eyeball with a Green and Yellow Iris

Also located on the first floor of the building is Prego Again. According to the signs in the windows, Prego Again is a gourmet deli with beer and wine available.

The Metal Face Sculpture is locate on the Corcoran Street side of 1615 17th Street NW, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Metal Face Sculpture.

Closest Metro Station: Dupont Circle is the Metro Station nearest to this sculpture.

Giant Pandas at the National Zoo

Giant Panda Mei Xiang or Tian Tian - Walking

Giant Panda Mei Xiang or Tian Tian - Walking

By far the most popular attraction at the National Zoo is the Giant Pandas exhibit. Giant Pandas come from the bamboo forests of central China. Two Giant Pandas, Mei Xiang and Tian Tian, are on loan to the National Zoo for a period of 10 years.

These cute, huge and absolutely distinctive bears sleep, eat and prance around in the Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat, an area of over 12,000 square feet provided for them in Washington DC.

Giant Panda Mei Xiang or Tian Tian - Waking From a Restful Nap

Giant Panda Mei Xiang or Tian Tian - Waking From a Restful Nap

These highly recognizable animals have black, rounded ears, an oval black area around each eye, black rear legs and black front legs with a black band that extends from the front legs up over the back. The rump and head are white resulting in a bear covered about 50% in white fur and 50% in black fur.

The attractive mammals eat a diet of little other than bamboo. This is a low energy food source, so these large animals must eat quite a bit of it. And this diet leaves one of the cutest animals in the world with little energy for running, jumping, chasing and fighting. But these large, docile bamboo eaters can and will defend themselves and do occasionally wrestle.

Mei Xiang and Tian Tian are on loan from the China Wildlife Conservation Association.

Click National Zoo to see the StationStart.com entry about the Smithsonian National Zoological Park.

Closest Metro Station: Two Metro Stations are near the Zoo. The pedestrian entrance to the National Zoo on Connecticut Avenue NW is the same distance from both the Cleveland Park Metro Station and the Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams Morgan Metro Station. The main difference is that the walk from the Cleveland Park Metro Station is fairly level while the walk from the Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams Morgan Metro Station is definitely uphill.

Sumatran Tiger at the National Zoo

Pacing Sumatran Tiger at the National Zoo

Pacing Sumatran Tiger at the National Zoo

Only a small number of Sumatran tigers are alive today. Several live at the National Zoo out of the few hundred that survive. One female cub found in the wild in Sumatra was donated by Indonesia’s Jakarta Zoo as part of a program to ensure the survival of the species.

Tigers, unlike lions, like the water and enjoy swimming. But for the most part they spend time alone often hunting or marking their territory.

At the National Zoo they can often be seen pacing back and forth as in the photograph above.

Click National Zoo to see the StationStart.com entry about the Smithsonian National Zoological Park.

Closest Metro Station: Two Metro Stations are near the Zoo. The pedestrian entrance to the National Zoo on Connecticut Avenue NW is the same distance from both the Cleveland Park Metro Station and the Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams Morgan Metro Station. The main difference is that the walk from the Cleveland Park Metro Station is fairly level while the walk from the Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams Morgan Metro Station is definitely uphill.

White House Wall Painting in Adams Morgan

Wall Painting - White House in Adams Morgan

Wall Painting - White House in Adams Morgan

This painting of the White House is on the side of the building located at 2423 18th Street NW, Washington, DC. The building looked unoccupied when this photograph was taken in January 2010. But there were several signs in the front for a previous tenant, Mercedes Bien Vintage Clothing.

The image in this wall painting is of the White House from the Pennsylvania Avenue side with fluffy white clouds and blue sky behind. The White House has been painted so that it appears as a postcard or as a photograph with a white border placed against the other images in the mural. To the left of the White House postcard the Washington Monument rises the entire height of the mural which is a little less than halfway up the side of a three story brick building.

Three red stars of various sizes fill the lower left corner of the mural. These stars mirror the similar three red stars of the Washington DC flag.

The pieces of the mural are tied together by a large yellow banner that runs in front of the top of the Washington Monument and behind the White House postcard. The text on the banner reads, “If you lived here you’d be home now. But you still could not vote.”

The White House Wall Painting in Adams Morgan is on the side of 2423 18th Street NW, Washington, DC. Click Here for Google Map showing the location of this wall art.

Closest Metro Station: Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams Morgan is the Metro Station nearest to this wall painting.

Dupont Circle Mural by G. Byron Peck

Dupont Circle Mural by G. Byron Peck

Dupont Circle Mural by G. Byron Peck

This Dupont Circle Mural is painted in trompe l’oeil style which tricks the eye and gives a feeling of real depth. The three dimensional effect is apparent in the carved figure in the base of the fountain, in the red/orange marble column and in other features of the painting.

The carved figure is part of the base of the Dupont Circle Fountain. This same fountain is featured in another work by the same artist, the Metro Center Mural.

The spherical mirror in the image below adds to the 3-D effect by reflecting images on what looks very much like a realistic three dimensional curved surface. The buildings of Dupont Circle, the ornate border at the top of the mural and the base of the fountain are all set off against a clear blue sky highlighted by a bright white sun.

Dupont Circle Mural - Close Up of Mirror Ball From the Upper Left of the Mural

Dupont Circle Mural - Close Up of Mirror Ball From the Upper Left of the Mural

There is a second representation of a fisheye or ball shaped mirror located in the upper right portion of the mural. The distorted images of Dupont Circle buildings in the center and on the right are balanced against images of yellow, gray, black and orange that are reflected from the mural itself. Both spheres serve to join the outer reality of Dupont Circle in the form of buildings and sky with the less prominent painted reality of the mural.

Dupont Circle Mural - Close Up of Mirror Ball From the Upper Right of the Mural

Dupont Circle Mural - Close Up of Mirror Ball From the Upper Right of the Mural

This mural as well as the one at Metro Center were both painted by G. Byron Peck who has painted a number of murals in Washington DC as well as others around the world.

This mural is painted on the northwest side of 1736 Connecticut Avenue NW in Washington, DC. The Polo India Club Restaurant is located in this building. And the mural is above the Bistrot du Coin located at 1738 Connecticut Avenue NW.

The Dupont Circle Mural by G. Byron Peck is on the northwest side of 1736 Connecticut Avenue NW where Polo India Club is located. The mural is above Bistrot du Coin.

The Dupont Circle Mural by G. Byron Peck is on the northwest side of 1736 Connecticut Avenue NW where Polo India Club is located. The mural is above Bistrot du Coin.

Click Here for Google Map showing the location of the Dupont Circle Mural by G. Byron Peck.

Closest Metro Station: Dupont Circle on the Red Line is the nearest Metro Station to this mural.

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